1944.) 2 Chronicles 21

October 13, 2016

2 Chronicles 21   (NLT)

Jehoram Rules in Judah

1When Jehoshaphat died, he was buried with his ancestors in the City of David. Then his son Jehoram became the next king.

2 Jehoram’s brothers—the other sons of Jehoshaphat—were Azariah, Jehiel, Zechariah, Azariahu, Michael, and Shephatiah; all these were the sons of Jehoshaphat king of Judah. 3 Their father had given each of them valuable gifts of silver, gold, and costly items, and also some of Judah’s fortified towns. However, he designated Jehoram as the next king because he was the oldest. 4 But when Jehoram had become solidly established as king, he killed all his brothers and some of the other leaders of Judah.

You shall not kill.

Like Rehoboam, Jehoshaphat scattered his sons throughout the kingdom, away from the capital, to give the son who was now king, Jehoram, room to breathe in safety. But Jehoram was intent to strengthen his hand, so he slaughtered not only his brothers, but other leaders as well.

5 Jehoram was thirty-two years old when he became king, and he reigned in Jerusalem eight years. 6 But Jehoram followed the example of the kings of Israel and was as wicked as King Ahab, for he had married one of Ahab’s daughters.

Like mother, like daughter. Jehoram’s wife, Athaliah, was Jezebel’s daughter. The two of them are famous for their impiety and cruelty.

So Jehoram did what was evil in the Lord’s sight. 7 But the Lord did not want to destroy David’s dynasty, for he had made a covenant with David and promised that his descendants would continue to rule, shining like a lamp forever.

8 During Jehoram’s reign, the Edomites revolted against Judah and crowned their own king. 9 So Jehoram went out with his full army and all his chariots. The Edomites surrounded him and his chariot commanders, but he went out at night and attacked them under cover of darkness. 10 Even so, Edom has been independent from Judah to this day. The town of Libnah also revolted about that same time. All this happened because Jehoram had abandoned the Lord, the God of his ancestors. 11 He had built pagan shrines in the hill country of Judah and had led the people of Jerusalem and Judah to give themselves to pagan gods and to go astray.

I am the Lord your God.  You shall have no other gods before me.

Again we see such clarity from the Chronicler. The loss of tribute nations is not a result of changing times or some such thing, but is directly traced to Jehoram’s disobedience to God and particularly to his idol worship.

12 Then Elijah the prophet wrote Jehoram this letter:

“This is what the Lord, the God of your ancestor David, says: You have not followed the good example of your father, Jehoshaphat, or your grandfather King Asa of Judah. 13 Instead, you have been as evil as the kings of Israel. You have led the people of Jerusalem and Judah to worship idols, just as King Ahab did in Israel. And you have even killed your own brothers, men who were better than you. 14 So now the Lord is about to strike you, your people, your children, your wives, and all that is yours with a heavy blow. 15 You yourself will suffer with a severe intestinal disease that will get worse each day until your bowels come out.”

16 Then the Lord stirred up the Philistines and the Arabs, who lived near the Ethiopians, to attack Jehoram. 17 They marched against Judah, broke down its defenses, and carried away everything of value in the royal palace, including the king’s sons and his wives.

My mother used to say, “What you put into the lives of others, comes back into your own.” See how true it is here for Jehoram!

Only his youngest son, Ahaziah, was spared.

18 After all this, the Lord struck Jehoram with the severe intestinal disease. 19 The disease grew worse and worse, and at the end of two years it caused his bowels to come out, and he died in agony.

This was a fitting judgment. There was a sense in which Jehoram was rotten spiritually from within; here, God simply caused the physical condition of his body to correspond to the spiritual condition of his soul – so he died in severe pain.

–David Guzik

His people did not build a great funeral fire to honor him as they had done for his ancestors.

20 Jehoram was thirty-two years old when he became king, and he reigned in Jerusalem eight years. No one was sorry when he died. They buried him in the City of David, but not in the royal cemetery.



HERE  is a reminder of how much we need the Lord! “Nothing Without You”  by Bebo Norman.


New Living Translation (NLT)   Holy Bible. New Living Translation copyright© 1996, 2004, 2007 by Tyndale House Foundation. Used by permission of Tyndale House Publishers Inc., Carol Stream, Illinois 60188. All rights reserved.

Images courtesy of:
Jehoram’s gravestone.    https://dwellingintheword.files.wordpress.com/2011/07/jehoram_edited.jpg
Ten Commandment tablets.    http://www.gettysburgseminary.org/mhoffman/techxn/wd/Index_files/image008.gif
Jehoram reads Elijah’s letter.    http://oneyearbibleimages.com/2_chron_21_12_there_came_a_writing_from_.jpg

1943. 2 Chronicles 20

October 12, 2016

2 Chronicles 20   (NLT)

War with Surrounding Nations

1 After this, the armies of the Moabites, Ammonites, and some of the Meunites declared war on Jehoshaphat. 2Messengers came and told Jehoshaphat, “A vast army from Edom is marching against you from beyond the Dead Sea. They are already at Hazazon-tamar.” (This was another name for En-gedi.)

This great multitude was a significant threat against Jehoshaphat, whose last experience on the field of battle was a narrow escape from death.

–David Guzik

3 Jehoshaphat was terrified by this news and begged the Lord for guidance. He also ordered everyone in Judah to begin fasting. 4 So people from all the towns of Judah came to Jerusalem to seek the Lord’s help.

Our son Devlin McGuire, currently in his final year at Princeton Theological Seminary (above), put this video clip together, using a bit of a sermon by David Platt (author of the best-selling book Radical) and the music “Untitled 3” by Sigur Ros.  The subject of the two minute message  HERE  is prayer.

Jehoshaphat’s Prayer

There is a conviction in Jehoshaphat’s prayer of God’s power to change any situation utterly, without the need of human cooperation.  This is still the essence of Christian prayer.  When people’s temporal hopes are gone—and dreams of perfect happiness on earth inevitably prove illusory—the best secular answer is an acquiescent, perhaps bitter, resignation.  Where there is faith  in God, in glorious contrast, the “we do not know what to do” merely leads into “but our eyes are upon thee.”  There is no excuse for Christian hopelessness.

–J. G. McConville

5 Jehoshaphat stood before the community of Judah and Jerusalem in front of the new courtyard at the Temple of the Lord. 6 He prayed, “O Lord, God of our ancestors, you alone are the God who is in heaven. You are ruler of all the kingdoms of the earth. You are powerful and mighty; no one can stand against you! 7 O our God, did you not drive out those who lived in this land when your people Israel arrived? And did you not give this land forever to the descendants of your friend Abraham? 8 Your people settled here and built this Temple to honor your name. 9 They said, ‘Whenever we are faced with any calamity such as war, plague, or famine, we can come to stand in your presence before this Temple where your name is honored. We can cry out to you to save us, and you will hear us and rescue us.’

10 “And now see what the armies of Ammon, Moab, and Mount Seir are doing. You would not let our ancestors invade those nations when Israel left Egypt, so they went around them and did not destroy them. 11 Now see how they reward us! For they have come to throw us out of your land, which you gave us as an inheritance. 12 O our God, won’t you stop them? We are powerless against this mighty army that is about to attack us. We do not know what to do, but we are looking to you for help.”


Adam Clarke called this “One of the most sensible, pious, correct, and as to its composition one of the most elegant prayers ever offered under the Old Testament dispensation.”

I have often prayed this last verse! Lord, I do not know what to do next, so my eyes are on You. And somehow the next step is made clear.

The Oracle and Response

Jahaziel the Levite declares that this victory will, in a special way, be God’s alone. Jehoshaphat and his army will have the role of onlookers on this occasion. The Lord will prove himself trustworthy to those who are wholly committed to God, to those who are staking wealth and welfare on the outcome and leaning entirely on the strength of the Lord.

13 As all the men of Judah stood before the Lord with their little ones, wives, and children, 14 the Spirit of the Lord came upon one of the men standing there. His name was Jahaziel son of Zechariah, son of Benaiah, son of Jeiel, son of Mattaniah, a Levite who was a descendant of Asaph.

15 He said, “Listen, all you people of Judah and Jerusalem! Listen, King Jehoshaphat! This is what the Lord says: Do not be afraid! Don’t be discouraged by this mighty army, for the battle is not yours, but God’s.


16 Tomorrow, march out against them. You will find them coming up through the ascent of Ziz at the end of the valley that opens into the wilderness of Jeruel. 17 But you will not even need to fight. Take your positions; then stand still and watch the Lord’s victory. He is with you, O people of Judah and Jerusalem. Do not be afraid or discouraged. Go out against them tomorrow, for the Lord is with you!”

18 Then King Jehoshaphat bowed low with his face to the ground. And all the people of Judah and Jerusalem did the same, worshiping the Lord. 19 Then the Levites from the clans of Kohath and Korah stood to praise the Lord, the God of Israel, with a very loud shout.

20 Early the next morning the army of Judah went out into the wilderness of Tekoa. On the way Jehoshaphat stopped and said, “Listen to me, all you people of Judah and Jerusalem! Believe in the Lord your God, and you will be able to stand firm. Believe in his prophets, and you will succeed.”

J. B. Rotherham’s translation (Emphasized Bible, 1902) of 2 Chronicles 20:20 has a word of joy for us all:  Trust ye in the Lord your God and ye shall be trusted. We shall be trusted with answers to prayer which are not what we desired, as well as with those which are. Isn’t it wonderful to be trusted like that, with just anything God wants and sees is best?

–Amy Carmichael

21 After consulting the people, the king appointed singers to walk ahead of the army, singing to the Lord and praising him for his holy splendor. This is what they sang:

“Give thanks to the Lord;
his faithful love endures forever!”

They did not rest on their own merits or even the merits of Abraham, Moses, or David. They trusted and rested on the enduring mercy of God.

The Victory

The nation is restored to a state of blessing, characterized by riches, possession of her land, the inspiration of fear in her enemies, and joyful worship in the Temple.

22 At the very moment they began to sing and give praise, the Lord caused the armies of Ammon, Moab, and Mount Seir to start fighting among themselves. 23 The armies of Moab and Ammon turned against their allies from Mount Seir and killed every one of them. After they had destroyed the army of Seir, they began attacking each other. 24 So when the army of Judah arrived at the lookout point in the wilderness, all they saw were dead bodies lying on the ground as far as they could see. Not a single one of the enemy had escaped.

25 King Jehoshaphat and his men went out to gather the plunder. They found vast amounts of equipment, clothing, and other valuables—more than they could carry. There was so much plunder that it took them three days just to collect it all! 26 On the fourth day they gathered in the Valley of Blessing, which got its name that day because the people praised and thanked the Lord there. It is still called the Valley of Blessing today.

Psalm 60:12   (NIV)

With God we will gain the victory,
    and he will trample down our enemies.

27 Then all the men returned to Jerusalem, with Jehoshaphat leading them, overjoyed that the Lord had given them victory over their enemies. 28 They marched into Jerusalem to the music of harps, lyres, and trumpets, and they proceeded to the Temple of the Lord.

29 When all the surrounding kingdoms heard that the Lord himself had fought against the enemies of Israel, the fear of God came over them. 30 So Jehoshaphat’s kingdom was at peace, for his God had given him rest on every side.



Could God do it?  Yes, God could!  What a great story!  And what a fun song!  “Can He? Could He? Would He? Did He?  (Yes, He can, He could, He would, and He did!)” performed for you  HERE  with all good cheer by the Ernie Haase Signature Sound!


Summary of Jehoshaphat’s Reign

31So Jehoshaphat ruled over the land of Judah. He was thirty-five years old when he became king, and he reigned in Jerusalem twenty-five years. His mother was Azubah, the daughter of Shilhi.

32 Jehoshaphat was a good king, following the ways of his father, Asa. He did what was pleasing in the Lord’s sight. 33 During his reign, however, he failed to remove all the pagan shrines, and the people never fully committed themselves to follow the God of their ancestors.

34 The rest of the events of Jehoshaphat’s reign, from beginning to end, are recorded in The Record of Jehu Son of Hanani, which is included in The Book of the Kings of Israel.

35 Some time later King Jehoshaphat of Judah made an alliance with King Ahaziah of Israel, who was very wicked. 36 Together they built a fleet of trading ships at the port of Ezion-geber. 37 Then Eliezer son of Dodavahu from Mareshah prophesied against Jehoshaphat. He said, “Because you have allied yourself with King Ahaziah, the Lord will destroy your work.” So the ships met with disaster and never put out to sea.

The Chronicler makes an explicit link between the foundering of Jehoshaphat’s ships, before they earned him a penny, and this unholy alliance with another wicked king of Israel. And so a reign that was in many ways glorious, ends on this sad and unsatisfying note.


New Living Translation (NLT)   Holy Bible. New Living Translation copyright© 1996, 2004, 2007 by Tyndale House Foundation. Used by permission of Tyndale House Publishers Inc., Carol Stream, Illinois 60188. All rights reserved.

Images courtesy of:
Keep calm and trust God.    http://ih2.redbubble.net/work.5919464.3.flat,550×550,075,f.keep-calm-and-trust-god.jpg
verse 12.  https://airmiles.files.wordpress.com/2012/04/2011-12-261.jpg 
verse 15.   https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/564x/66/f1/0d/66f10d8bb6a5d28124d8e5bfab1f9409.jpg

1942.) 2 Chronicles 19

October 11, 2016

2 Chronicles 19   (NLT)

Jehoshaphat Appoints Judges

1 When King Jehoshaphat of Judah arrived safely home in Jerusalem,

“The fact that Jehoshaphat reached home safely is significant. It contrasts his fate with Ahab’s, and testifies to God’s grace given to a person who was almost destroyed by undiscerning folly.”

–Martin J. Selman (lecturer in Old Testament, director of postgraduate studies and deputy principal at Spurgeon’s College, London)

2 Jehu son of Hanani the seer went out to meet him. “Why should you help the wicked and love those who hate the Lord?” he asked the king. “Because of what you have done, the Lord is very angry with you.

Psalm 7:11   (ESV)

God is a righteous judge.

3Even so, there is some good in you, for you have removed the Asherah poles throughout the land, and you have committed yourself to seeking God.”

Psalm 97:10   (NIV) 

Let those who love the LORD hate evil,
for he guards the lives of his faithful ones
and delivers them from the hand of the wicked.

4 Jehoshaphat lived in Jerusalem, but he went out among the people, traveling from Beersheba to the hill country of Ephraim, encouraging the people to return to the Lord, the God of their ancestors.

This means that he restricted his adventures abroad. He no longer went to the northern kingdom of Israel and was content to stay where he should. Instead, he personally traveled about his nation working in the cause of godliness.

“These itinerant campaigns have no real equivalent in the Old Testament, and the prophets, even though they traveled about, were not involved in systematic teaching of the word of God. The nearest parallel is in the New Testament, in Jesus’ own itinerant ministry.”

–Martin J. Selman

5 He appointed judges throughout the nation in all the fortified towns, 6 and he said to them, “Always think carefully before pronouncing judgment. Remember that you do not judge to please people but to please the Lord. He will be with you when you render the verdict in each case. 7 Fear the Lord and judge with integrity, for the Lord our God does not tolerate perverted justice, partiality, or the taking of bribes.”

Romans 2:11   (CEV)

God doesn’t have any favorites!

8 In Jerusalem, Jehoshaphat appointed some of the Levites and priests and clan leaders in Israel to serve as judges for cases involving the Lord’s regulations and for civil disputes. 9 These were his instructions to them: “You must always act in the fear of the Lord, with faithfulness and an undivided heart.


10 Whenever a case comes to you from fellow citizens in an outlying town, whether a murder case or some other violation of God’s laws, commands, decrees, or regulations, you must warn them not to sin against the Lord, so that he will not be angry with you and them. Do this and you will not be guilty.

“Without good and wholesome laws, no nation can be prosperous; and vain are the best laws if they be not judiciously and conscientiously administered.” 

–Adam Clarke (1760-1832,  British Methodist theologian and Biblical scholar)

11 “Amariah the high priest will have final say in all cases involving the Lord. Zebadiah son of Ishmael, a leader from the tribe of Judah, will have final say in all civil cases. The Levites will assist you in making sure that justice is served. Take courage as you fulfill your duties, and may the Lord be with those who do what is right.”

Christ as Judge and Saviour. Icon painted by Helen McIldowie Jenkins

God is pointed to as the model to be followed by judges in the land since God is the great and perfect judge over all the earth. Three things are pointed out in God’s character that these judges need to embrace in their own lives. God has no iniquity, is impartial, and not influenced by bribery. First, God is sinless and there is no shadow of darkness in His character in any way. We can be confident that God never acts out of selfishness and His motive towards us is always pure.  Second, God does not treat one person as better than another, nor does He show greater respect for one person than another. He treats everyone the same no matter what their name, race, position, or education. God treats you the same as Billy Graham, the president, or a king. Last, God is absolutely immune from any temptation towards bribery. That is a fact because of His character as well as His ownership of all things.

How will we all fare before this judge someday? Death is the shadow that hangs over all human life. The judgment is God’s evaluation of your life and mine. Though impossible to do so, we often attempt to escape the fact of death. The late newspaper tycoon William Randolph Hearst forbade anyone to use the word death in his presence. What a contrast to Philip II, King of Macedon and father of Alexander the Great, who commissioned a servant to come into his presence daily and solemnly announce, “Remember, Philip, you must die.”

2 Timothy 4:8 — “Finally, there is laid up for me the crown of righteousness, which the Lord, the righteous Judge, will give to me on that Day, and not to me only but also to all who have loved His appearing.”

–Ed Rea (biochemist, missionary, pastor)



HERE  is a simple little Scripture chorus that was a favorite of my mother. I remember her singing it as she worked around the house (although never in Samoan!).


New Living Translation (NLT)   Holy Bible. New Living Translation copyright© 1996, 2004, 2007 by Tyndale House Foundation. Used by permission of Tyndale House Publishers Inc., Carol Stream, Illinois 60188. All rights reserved.

Images courtesy of:
judge’s gavel.    http://www.attorneybusinesscard.net/images/wooden_judges_gavel_business_card-p240376415939920326qs8j_300.jpg
verse 9.   https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/736x/8b/02/16/8b0216f5698a1e7aa2cc63df6830a149.jpg
Jenkins.    http://www.elenisicons.co.uk/assets/images/thumbs/tn_christ_sinai.jpg

1941.) 2 Kings 1

October 10, 2016


2 Kings 1   (NIV)

The LORD’s Judgment on Ahaziah

After Ahab’s death, Moab rebelled against Israel.

As bad a spiritual leader as Ahab had been, he had brought political stability and economic boom to Israel. Now with his death, Moab tries to free itself. Moab had been under Israelite domination since the days of David (2 Samuel 8:2 and 8:11-12). This rebellion of Moab in the days of Ahaziah is significant of the decline of Israel’s power and the judgment of God.

–David Guzik

2 Now King Ahaziah had fallen through the lattice of his upper room in Samaria and injured himself.

Cool move, dude! He leaned on the wooden screen upstairs and fell to the downstairs!

So he sent messengers, saying to them, “Go and consult Baal-Zebub, the god of Ekron, to see if I will recover from this injury.”

Ahaziah sends not to the God of Israel, who brought them out of the land of Egypt, gave them the Law, and established them in their own country! No, he sends to an idol of a foreign land, a god also known as  Beelzebub, a common name for Satan. It means “lord of the flies.” If you have ever read William Golding’s book of that name, you know how terrifying and evil Beelzebub is.

3 But the angel of the LORD said to Elijah the Tishbite, “Go up and meet the messengers of the king of Samaria and ask them, ‘Is it because there is no God in Israel that you are going off to consult Baal-Zebub, the god of Ekron?’ 4 Therefore this is what the LORD says: ‘You will not leave the bed you are lying on. You will certainly die!’” So Elijah went.

5 When the messengers returned to the king, he asked them, “Why have you come back?”

6 “A man came to meet us,” they replied. “And he said to us, ‘Go back to the king who sent you and tell him, “This is what the LORD says: Is it because there is no God in Israel that you are sending messengers to consult Baal-Zebub, the god of Ekron? Therefore you will not leave the bed you are lying on. You will certainly die!”’”

7 The king asked them, “What kind of man was it who came to meet you and told you this?”

8 They replied, “He had a garment of hair and had a leather belt around his waist.”

The king said, “That was Elijah the Tishbite.”

This message gives Ahaziah a gift:  time to repent before his death. Of course, that is not how he interprets it!

9 Then he sent to Elijah a captain with his company of fifty men. The captain went up to Elijah, who was sitting on the top of a hill, and said to him, “Man of God, the king says, ‘Come down!’”

Captain #1 knows he is wrong; he calls Elijah “Man of God,” even as he comes on an ungodly mission.

10 Elijah answered the captain, “If I am a man of God, may fire come down from heaven and consume you and your fifty men!” Then fire fell from heaven and consumed the captain and his men.

11 At this the king sent to Elijah another captain with his fifty men. The captain said to him, “Man of God, this is what the king says, ‘Come down at once!’”

12 “If I am a man of God,” Elijah replied, “may fire come down from heaven and consume you and your fifty men!” Then the fire of God fell from heaven and consumed him and his fifty men.

Twice the soldiers come to arrest Elijah, who is a righteous man being mistreated by an unrighteous king. The captains and their soldiers treat Elijah, but more truly his God, as if Elijah’s God were no more powerful than their own useless gods. Elijah turns the situation over to God, who shows His power mightily.

13 So the king sent a third captain with his fifty men. This third captain went up and fell on his knees before Elijah. “Man of God,” he begged, “please have respect for my life and the lives of these fifty men, your servants! 14 See, fire has fallen from heaven and consumed the first two captains and all their men. But now have respect for my life!”

The third captain has learned humility!

15 The angel of the LORD said to Elijah, “Go down with him; do not be afraid of him.” So Elijah got up and went down with him to the king.

16 He told the king,


“This is what the LORD says: Is it because there is no God in Israel for you to consult that you have sent messengers to consult Baal-Zebub, the god of Ekron? Because you have done this, you will never leave the bed you are lying on. You will certainly die!” 17 So he died, according to the word of the LORD that Elijah had spoken.

Because Ahaziah had no son, Joram succeeded him as king in the second year of Jehoram son of Jehoshaphat king of Judah.

Joram was Ahaziah’s brother, also a son of Ahab.

18 As for all the other events of Ahaziah’s reign, and what he did, are they not written in the book of the annals of the kings of Israel?


“Everything he did was weak, faithless, and miserable; he achieved nothing but ruin and failure. He let Moab rebel. He hurt himself in a clumsy accident. He foolishly attempted to use military force against Elijah. And worse, he sought help in the wrong place–in Philistia at the altar of a pagan god.”
–Russell H. Dilday



For all his earthly power, Ahaziah seems to have lived a life that counted for very little. What a sad waste!  There is another, better, way to live.  HERE  Kirk Dearman sings “The Dash.”


New International Version, ©2010 (NIV) Copyright © 1973, 1978, 1984, 2010 by Biblica
Images courtesy of:
2 Kings.   https://pk4yahweh.files.wordpress.com/2012/11/2kings1.jpg
Lord of the Flies.    http://cdn.mhpbooks.com/2011/11/lotf2.png
Elijah speaks to the sick king.    http://www.carpescriptura.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/04/2-Kings-1.jpg
loser sign.    https://www.askideas.com/media/73/Loser-Sign-By-Hand-Clipart.jpg

1940.) Psalm 78

October 7, 2016

Psalm 78 (NIV)

Everyone knows the old adage:
Those that forget the past are doomed to repeat it. 

I think of the Northern Kingdom of Israel, following in the pattern of Jeroboam-who-made-Israel-to-sin.

“Psalm 78 is the longest of the historical psalms. Its lesson is that history must not repeat itself. The people must never again be unbelieving.”
–James Montgomery Boice

 1 My people, hear my teaching;
listen to the words of my mouth.
2 I will open my mouth with a parable;
I will utter hidden things, things from of old—
3 things we have heard and known,
things our ancestors have told us.
4 We will not hide them from their descendants;
we will tell the next generation
the praiseworthy deeds of the LORD,
his power, and the wonders he has done.

Proverbs 22:6 (KJV)

 Train up a child in the way he should go: and when he is old, he will not depart from it.

5 He decreed statutes for Jacob
and established the law in Israel,
which he commanded our ancestors
to teach their children,
6 so the next generation would know them,
even the children yet to be born,
and they in turn would tell their children.
Centuries later the Apostle Paul would explain that one of the great advantages God gave to Israel was that He committed to them His word, the oracles of God (Romans 3:2).
–David Guzik
7 Then they would put their trust in God
and would not forget his deeds
but would keep his commands.
8 They would not be like their ancestors—
a stubborn and rebellious generation,
whose hearts were not loyal to God,
whose spirits were not faithful to him.

1 Corinthians 10:11-12 (NIV)

These things happened to them as examples and were written down as warnings for us, on whom the culmination of the ages has come.  So, if you think you are standing firm, be careful that you don’t fall!

9 The men of Ephraim, though armed with bows,
turned back on the day of battle;
10 they did not keep God’s covenant
and refused to live by his law.
11 They forgot what he had done,
the wonders he had shown them.
Forgot; not historically, but practically. They did not so remember them, as to love, and serve, and trust that God of whose infinite power and goodness they had such ample experience.”
–Matthew Poole (1624-1679, English Nonconformist theologian
12 He did miracles in the sight of their ancestors
in the land of Egypt, in the region of Zoan.
13 He divided the sea and led them through;
he made the water stand up like a wall.
14 He guided them with the cloud by day
and with light from the fire all night.
Open now the crystal fountain,
Whence the healing stream doth flow;
Let the fire and cloudy pillar
Lead me all my journey through.
Strong Deliverer, strong Deliverer,
Be Thou still my Strength and Shield;
Be Thou still my Strength and Shield.
15 He split the rocks in the wilderness
and gave them water as abundant as the seas;
16 he brought streams out of a rocky crag
and made water flow down like rivers.
17 But they continued to sin against him,
rebelling in the wilderness against the Most High.
18 They willfully put God to the test
by demanding the food they craved.
19 They spoke against God;
they said, “Can God really
spread a table in the wilderness?
In 1933, the middle of the Great Depression, a young Irishman named J. Edwin Orr left a good paying job. With no fixed source of income, he trusted that God would provide for him and his mother. He planned to travel around Great Britain with the message of prayer, salvation, and revival. He left Belfast with 2 shillings and 8 pence, about 65 cents. He had a bicycle, a change of clothes, and a Bible. He spent the next year travelling to every county in Great Britain and organized some 300 prayer groups dedicated to pray for revival. He wrote a book about it all and somehow convinced a publisher to take it, after being rejected 17 times. That first book was titled Can God — ?  It was based on Psalm 78:19, and was published in 1934. It sold hundreds of thousands of copies and was a tremendous inspiration to Christians in that day. Orr’s book and his life was a remarkable demonstration of the fact that God can prepare a table in the wilderness.
–David Guzik
Ps78 Ps23
20 True, he struck the rock,
and water gushed out,
streams flowed abundantly,
but can he also give us bread?
Can he supply meat for his people?”
21 When the LORD heard them, he was furious;
God was “furious” at their ingratitude. That is food for thought in our lives which are, let’s be honest, pretty easy, pretty comfortable. Are we careful to be thankful rather than to complain?
his fire broke out against Jacob,
and his wrath rose against Israel,
22 for they did not believe in God
or trust in his deliverance.
23 Yet he gave a command to the skies above
and opened the doors of the heavens;
24 he rained down manna for the people to eat,
he gave them the grain of heaven.
25 Human beings ate the bread of angels;
he sent them all the food they could eat.
Manna in the Morning

Cook fires,

clothing scraps,

animal dung

have long disappeared

from the desert.

But the story remains:

how the Israelites

fled Pharaoh

under a spiral

of swirling white clouds

as angels swept

stones and snakes

from their path.

For forty years,

Jews followed Moses

with manna-filled bellies,

thirst quenched by

a wondrous wandering well–

the same fountain I sipped

this candle-lit evening

with honeyed challah

and roasted chicken.


Carrying dishes to the sink,

my sandaled feet skip

on a freshly swept  floor,

free of snakes and stones.

Tonight, Pharaoh lies drowned

behind me

and I am traveling to Canaan

under a sheltering white cloud,

certain of manna in the morning.

–Jacqueline Jules
26 He let loose the east wind from the heavens
and by his power made the south wind blow.
27 He rained meat down on them like dust,
birds like sand on the seashore.
28 He made them come down inside their camp,
all around their tents.
29 They ate till they were gorged—
he had given them what they craved.
30 But before they turned from what they craved,
even while the food was still in their mouths,
31 God’s anger rose against them;
he put to death the sturdiest among them,
cutting down the young men of Israel.
32 In spite of all this, they kept on sinning;
in spite of his wonders, they did not believe.
Ps78 hard heart
What more could God have done? The tragedy of hard hearts!
33 So he ended their days in futility
and their years in terror.
34 Whenever God slew them, they would seek him;
they eagerly turned to him again.

Ps78 seekmyface

Hosea 5:15 (ESV)

 I will return again to my place,
   until they acknowledge their guilt and seek my face,
   and in their distress earnestly seek me.

35 They remembered that God was their Rock,
that God Most High was their Redeemer.
36 But then they would flatter him with their mouths,
lying to him with their tongues;
37 their hearts were not loyal to him,
they were not faithful to his covenant.
38 Yet he was merciful;
he forgave their iniquities
and did not destroy them.
Time after time he restrained his anger
and did not stir up his full wrath.
39 He remembered that they were but flesh,
a passing breeze that does not return.

Psalm 103:15-18 (ESV)

As for man, his days are like grass;  
he flourishes like a flower of the field;
for the wind passes over it, and it is gone,  
and its place knows it no more.
But the steadfast love of the LORD
is from everlasting to everlasting on those who fear him,  
and his righteousness to children’s children,
to those who keep his covenant  
and remember to do his commandments.

40 How often they rebelled against him in the wilderness
and grieved him in the wasteland!
41 Again and again they put God to the test;
they vexed the Holy One of Israel.
42 They did not remember his power—
the day he redeemed them from the oppressor,
43 the day he displayed his signs in Egypt,
his wonders in the region of Zoan.
44 He turned their river into blood;
they could not drink from their streams.
45 He sent swarms of flies that devoured them,
and frogs that devastated them.
46 He gave their crops to the grasshopper,
their produce to the locust.
47 He destroyed their vines with hail
and their sycamore-figs with sleet.
48 He gave over their cattle to the hail,
their livestock to bolts of lightning.
49 He unleashed against them his hot anger,
his wrath, indignation and hostility—
a band of destroying angels.
50 He prepared a path for his anger;
he did not spare them from death
but gave them over to the plague.
51 He struck down all the firstborn of Egypt,
the firstfruits of manhood in the tents of Ham.
52 But he brought his people out like a flock;
he led them like sheep through the wilderness.
53 He guided them safely, so they were unafraid;
but the sea engulfed their enemies.
54 And so he brought them to the border of his holy land,
to the hill country his right hand had taken.
55 He drove out nations before them
and allotted their lands to them as an inheritance;
he settled the tribes of Israel in their homes.

Acts 13:16-20 (NLT)

So Paul stood, lifted his hand to quiet them, and started speaking. “Men of Israel,” he said, “and you God-fearing Gentiles, listen to me.

“The God of this nation of Israel chose our ancestors and made them multiply and grow strong during their stay in Egypt. Then with a powerful arm he led them out of their slavery.  He put up with them through forty years of wandering in the wilderness.  Then he destroyed seven nations in Canaan and gave their land to Israel as an inheritance.  All this took about 450 years.”

56 But they put God to the test
and rebelled against the Most High;
they did not keep his statutes.
57 Like their ancestors they were disloyal and faithless,
as unreliable as a faulty bow.
58 They angered him with their high places;
they aroused his jealousy with their idols.
59 When God heard them, he was furious;
he rejected Israel completely.

God is “furious” again — this time for idolatry, for valuing things over God. Do we yield our lives entirely to his will? Is the Lord truly first as we consider what to think, to say, to do?

60 He abandoned the tabernacle of Shiloh,
the tent he had set up among humans.
61 He sent the ark of his might into captivity,
his splendor into the hands of the enemy.
62 He gave his people over to the sword;
he was furious with his inheritance.
63 Fire consumed their young men,
and their young women had no wedding songs;
64 their priests were put to the sword,
and their widows could not weep.

Psalm 6:8-10 (NLT)

Go away, all you who do evil,
      for the Lord has heard my weeping.
The Lord has heard my plea;
      the Lord will answer my prayer.
May all my enemies be disgraced and terrified.
      May they suddenly turn back in shame.

65 Then the Lord awoke as from sleep,
as a warrior wakes from the stupor of wine.
66 He beat back his enemies;
he put them to everlasting shame.
67 Then he rejected the tents of Joseph,
he did not choose the tribe of Ephraim;
68 but he chose the tribe of Judah,
Mount Zion, which he loved.
69 He built his sanctuary like the heights,
like the earth that he established forever.
70 He chose David his servant
and took him from the sheep pens;
71 from tending the sheep he brought him
to be the shepherd of his people Jacob,
of Israel his inheritance.
72 And David shepherded them with integrity of heart;
with skillful hands he led them.

“If Israel’s record is her shame, God’s persistent goodness emerges as her hope (and ours) for the unfinished story.”
–Derek Kidner (1913-2008, British Old Testament scholar)



One of my favorites from David and Isaac Watts!  HERE  is “My Shepherd Will Supply My Need,” which contains some of the most comforting lines I know:

The sure provisions of my God attend me all my days;
O may Thy house be mine abode, and all my work be praise!
There would I find a settled rest, while others go and come,
No more a stranger or a guest, but like a child at home.


New International Version (NIV)   Copyright © 1973, 1978, 1984, 2011 by Biblica

Images courtesy of:
Tell it . . .   http://in-formatio.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/08/Psalm-78-4-1.jpg
children at church.   http://images.clipartpanda.com/kids-church-clip-art-kids20church.jpg
history.  http://philmontfirecompany.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/history-color1.gif
pillar of fire.   https://dwellingintheword.files.wordpress.com/2011/11/tabernacle_by_shawnrl61.jpg
You prepare a table.    https://dwellingintheword.files.wordpress.com/2016/10/ed126-creation-ss-6.jpg
manna falling.    https://awildernessvoice.files.wordpress.com/2015/11/1-manna-falling-from-heaven.jpg
hard heart.   http://www.deebrestin.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/heart-of-stone2.jpg
seek my face.   https://fruitfulfellowship.files.wordpress.com/2015/06/seekmyface.jpg?w=365&h=365&crop=1
beach grass swaying in the wind.     http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5025/5550514589_ba8361f09a.jpg
10 plagues.   http://www.nccg.org/10_plagues.gif
menorah.   http://rlv.zcache.com/menorah_photosculpture-p153231483757751702z89x5_400.jpg
praying hands.    http://cliparts.co/cliparts/Bca/rpo/Bcarpodzi.gif

1939.) 2 Chronicles 18

October 6, 2016

01K22 jehoshaphat-ahab

2 Chronicles 18   (NLT)

Jehoshaphat and Ahab

Jehoshaphat enjoyed great riches and high esteem, and he made an alliance with Ahab of Israel by having his son marry Ahab’s daughter. 2A few years later he went to Samaria to visit Ahab, who prepared a great banquet for him and his officials. They butchered great numbers of sheep, goats, and cattle for the feast. Then Ahab enticed Jehoshaphat to join forces with him to recover Ramoth-gilead.

3 “Will you go with me to Ramoth-gilead?” King Ahab of Israel asked King Jehoshaphat of Judah.

Jehoshaphat replied, “Why, of course! You and I are as one, and my troops are your troops. We will certainly join you in battle.” 4 Then Jehoshaphat added, “But first let’s find out what the Lord says.”

This does seem curious. Jehoshaphat has already committed himself to the enterprise (v. 3) and he will later disregard the advice that he will be given (v. 28). So what was the point of asking a prophet what the Lord would say? 

Yes, and am I not just the same?  I determine what I want to do, and I do what I want to do, and in between, oh, I better add asking the Lord to bless it.

5 So the king of Israel summoned the prophets, 400 of them, and asked them, “Should we go to war against Ramoth-gilead, or should I hold back?”

They all replied, “Yes, go right ahead! God will give the king victory.”

6 But Jehoshaphat asked, “Is there not also a prophet of the Lord here? We should ask him the same question.”

7 The king of Israel replied to Jehoshaphat, “There is one more man who could consult the Lord for us, but I hate him. He never prophesies anything but trouble for me! His name is Micaiah son of Imlah.”

Jehoshaphat replied, “That’s not the way a king should talk! Let’s hear what he has to say.”

8 So the king of Israel called one of his officials and said, “Quick! Bring Micaiah son of Imlah.”

Micaiah Prophesies against Ahab

9 King Ahab of Israel and King Jehoshaphat of Judah, dressed in their royal robes, were sitting on thrones at the threshing floor near the gate of Samaria. All of Ahab’s prophets were prophesying there in front of them. 10One of them, Zedekiah son of Kenaanah, made some iron horns and proclaimed, “This is what the Lord says: With these horns you will gore the Arameans to death!”

11 All the other prophets agreed. “Yes,” they said, “go up to Ramoth-gilead and be victorious, for the Lord will give the king victory!”

12 Meanwhile, the messenger who went to get Micaiah said to him, “Look, all the prophets are promising victory for the king. Be sure that you agree with them and promise success.”

13 But Micaiah replied, “As surely as the Lord lives, I will say only what my God says.”

2Chr18 speak

14 When Micaiah arrived before the king, Ahab asked him, “Micaiah, should we go to war against Ramoth-gilead, or should I hold back?”

Micaiah replied sarcastically, “Yes, go up and be victorious, for you will have victory over them!”

15 But the king replied sharply, “How many times must I demand that you speak only the truth to me when you speak for the Lord?”

16 Then Micaiah told him, “In a vision I saw all Israel scattered on the mountains, like sheep without a shepherd. And the Lord said, ‘Their master has been killed. Send them home in peace.’”

17 “Didn’t I tell you?” the king of Israel exclaimed to Jehoshaphat. “He never prophesies anything but trouble for me.”

18 Then Micaiah continued, “Listen to what the Lord says! I saw the Lord sitting on his throne with all the armies of heaven around him, on his right and on his left. 19 And the Lord said, ‘Who can entice King Ahab of Israel to go into battle against Ramoth-gilead so he can be killed?’

“There were many suggestions, 20 and finally a spirit approached the Lord and said, ‘I can do it!’

“‘How will you do this?’ the Lord asked.

21 “And the spirit replied, ‘I will go out and inspire all of Ahab’s prophets to speak lies.’

“‘You will succeed,’ said the Lord. ‘Go ahead and do it.’

22 “So you see, the Lord has put a lying spirit in the mouths of your prophets. For the Lord has pronounced your doom.”

John 8:44   (NIV)

You belong to your father, the devil, and you want to carry out your father’s desires. He was a murderer from the beginning, not holding to the truth, for there is no truth in him. When he lies, he speaks his native language, for he is a liar and the father of lies.

23 Then Zedekiah son of Kenaanah walked up to Micaiah and slapped him across the face. “Since when did the Spirit of the Lord leave me to speak to you?” he demanded.

24 And Micaiah replied, “You will find out soon enough when you are trying to hide in some secret room!”

25 “Arrest him!” the king of Israel ordered. “Take him back to Amon, the governor of the city, and to my son Joash. 26 Give them this order from the king: ‘Put this man in prison, and feed him nothing but bread and water until I return safely from the battle!’”

It is important to realize that the “spirit of falsehood” sent by God actually deceives no one. It is sent to those who recognize the truth and suppress it.  When Micaiah first addresses Ahab with the ironic words of v. 14 (i.e., the terms which the “spirit of falsehood” has suggested), Ahab sees through it at once and demands—irony of ironies—the truth (v. 15)! When Ahab goes to battle he has heard and recognized the truth, and does not pretend otherwise. His lament of v. 17 is not an accusation of the prophet, but a grim knowledge that he would never enjoy blessing from God. He goes to his destiny against Syria because—in spite of the Word of God—he is determined to be godless.

–J. G. McConville

27 But Micaiah replied, “If you return safely, it will mean that the Lord has not spoken through me!” Then he added to those standing around, “Everyone mark my words!”

The Death of Ahab

28 So King Ahab of Israel and King Jehoshaphat of Judah led their armies against Ramoth-gilead. 29The king of Israel said to Jehoshaphat, “As we go into battle, I will disguise myself so no one will recognize me, but you wear your royal robes.” So the king of Israel disguised himself, and they went into battle.

Oh, Jehoshaphat, dressed as a king for battle. Is it brilliant faith — or stupid naivety?

30 Meanwhile, the king of Aram had issued these orders to his chariot commanders: “Attack only the king of Israel! Don’t bother with anyone else.” 31 So when the Aramean chariot commanders saw Jehoshaphat in his royal robes, they went after him. “There is the king of Israel!” they shouted. But Jehoshaphat called out, and the Lord saved him. God helped him by turning the attackers away from him. 32 As soon as the chariot commanders realized he was not the king of Israel, they stopped chasing him.

33 An Aramean soldier, however, randomly shot an arrow at the Israelite troops and hit the king of Israel between the joints of his armor. “Turn the horses and get me out of here!” Ahab groaned to the driver of the chariot. “I’m badly wounded!”

We already know what will happen. Better to be God’s prophet in jail than King Ahab in his chariot.

34 The battle raged all that day, and the king of Israel propped himself up in his chariot facing the Arameans. In the evening, just as the sun was setting, he died.



After the lies and unfaithfulness and death and general unpleasantness of this chapter — a little something to clear your mind!  HERE  is the wonderful Twila Paris and “We Will Glorify.”


New Living Translation (NLT)   Holy Bible. New Living Translation copyright© 1996, 2004, 2007 by Tyndale House Foundation. Used by permission of Tyndale House Publishers Inc., Carol Stream, Illinois 60188. All rights reserved.

Images courtesy of:
the Divided Kingdom.   http://media.freebibleimages.org/stories/FB_Jehoshaphat_Ahab/overview_images/001-jehoshaphat-ahab.jpg?1452613835
God bless me.    https://image.spreadshirtmedia.com/image-server/v1/designs/11109942,width%3D178,height%3D178.png
that I will speak.    https://unashamedwomen.files.wordpress.com/2016/05/2-chronicles-18-23.jpeg
Liar, liar, pants on fire.     http://keenetrial.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2009/09/liar-liar-pants-on-fire.jpg
Romans 6:23.    http://www.tattoobite.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/11/for-the-wages-of-sin-death-tattoo-design.jpg
death of King Ahab.    http://lavistachurchofchrist.org/Pictures/Religion%20in%20the%20Home%20(Part%205)/images/top_7.jpg

1938.) 1 Kings 22:29-53

October 5, 2016
We finish 1 Kings, which has been a litany of tragedy. Beginning with the twilight of great King David’s reign and the wisdom and magnificence of Solomon’s, it quickly deteriorated into national division, civil war, idol worship, and moral decay.

We finish 1 Kings, which has been a litany of tragedy. Beginning with the twilight of great King David’s reign and the wisdom and magnificence of Solomon’s, it quickly deteriorated into national division, civil war, idol worship, and moral decay.

1 Kings 22:29-53   (NIV)

Ahab Killed at Ramoth Gilead

29 So Ahab king of Israel and Jehoshaphat king of Judah went up to Ramoth Gilead. 30 The king of Israel said to Jehoshaphat, “I will enter the battle in disguise, but you wear your royal robes.” So the king of Israel disguised himself and went into battle.

31 Now the king of Aram had ordered his thirty-two chariot commanders, “Do not fight with anyone, small or great, except the king of Israel.” 32 When the chariot commanders saw Jehoshaphat, they thought, “Surely this is the king of Israel.”

Why did Jehoshaphat go into battle when he had heard the prophecy from the Lord that defeat was certain? And why did he go dressed in royal robes, with all but a target painted on him? This makes no sense to me.

So they turned to attack him, but when Jehoshaphat cried out, 33 the chariot commanders saw that he was not the king of Israel and stopped pursuing him.

1K22 called to the Lord

As this story is told in 2 Chronicles, it is clear that Jehoshaphat cried out to the Lord:

2 Chronicles 18:31-32 (ESV)

As soon as the captains of the chariots saw Jehoshaphat, they said, “It is the king of Israel.” So they turned to fight against him. And Jehoshaphat cried out, and the LORD helped him; God drew them away from him. For as soon as the captains of the chariots saw that it was not the king of Israel, they turned back from pursuing him.

34 But someone drew his bow at random and hit the king of Israel between the sections of his armor. The king told his chariot driver, “Wheel around and get me out of the fighting. I’ve been wounded.” 35 All day long the battle raged, and the king was propped up in his chariot facing the Arameans. The blood from his wound ran onto the floor of the chariot, and that evening he died. 36 As the sun was setting, a cry spread through the army: “Every man to his town. Every man to his land!”

The battle is lost and King Ahab is dead. The prophet Micaiah is vindicated!

37 So the king died and was brought to Samaria, and they buried him there. 38 They washed the chariot at a pool in Samaria (where the prostitutes bathed), and the dogs licked up his blood, as the word of the LORD had declared.

39 As for the other events of Ahab’s reign, including all he did, the palace he built and adorned with ivory, and the cities he fortified, are they not written in the book of the annals of the kings of Israel? 40 Ahab rested with his ancestors. And Ahaziah his son succeeded him as king.

Jehoshaphat King of Judah

41 Jehoshaphat son of Asa became king of Judah in the fourth year of Ahab king of Israel. 42 Jehoshaphat was thirty-five years old when he became king, and he reigned in Jerusalem twenty-five years. His mother’s name was Azubah daughter of Shilhi. 43 In everything he followed the ways of his father Asa and did not stray from them; he did what was right in the eyes of the LORD. The high places, however, were not removed, and the people continued to offer sacrifices and burn incense there. 44 Jehoshaphat was also at peace with the king of Israel.

45 As for the other events of Jehoshaphat’s reign, the things he achieved and his military exploits, are they not written in the book of the annals of the kings of Judah? 46 He rid the land of the rest of the male shrine prostitutes who remained there even after the reign of his father Asa. 47 There was then no king in Edom; a provincial governor ruled.

48 Now Jehoshaphat built a fleet of trading ships to go to Ophir for gold, but they never set sail—they were wrecked at Ezion Geber. 49 At that time Ahaziah son of Ahab said to Jehoshaphat, “Let my men sail with yours,” but Jehoshaphat refused.

50 Then Jehoshaphat rested with his ancestors and was buried with them in the city of David his father. And Jehoram his son succeeded him as king.

The writer of 1 Kings summarized some of the remarkable accomplishments of Jehoshaphat, who was one of the better kings of Judah. From 2 Chronicles we learn many of Jehoshaphat’s other accomplishments.

  • He sent teachers of God’s Word out to all his kingdom (2 Chronicles 17:7-9).
  • He established a permanent military garrison along the northern frontier (2 Chronicles 17:1-2, 12).
  • He trained and equipping a sizable army (2 Chronicles 17:14-19) that was able to quell a Transjordan invasion (2 Chronicles 20:1-30).
  • He placed Edom under Judean control, controlling an important caravan route to the south (2 Kings 3:8-27; 2 Chronicles 20:36).
  • God blessed his reign so much that the fear of the Lord came upon neighboring nations so that they did not make war against Jehoshaphat (2 Chronicles 17:10).
  • Jehoshaphat was also an able administrator, implementing judicial reforms (2 Chronicles 19:5-11) and religious reforms (2 Chronicles 17:3-9).
  • Jehoshaphat was also the king connected to the famous incident when the army of Judah saw a great victory won as the Levites led the battle with praise (2 Chronicles 20:15-23).

—David Guzik

Ahaziah King of Israel

1K22 idol

51 Ahaziah son of Ahab became king of Israel in Samaria in the seventeenth year of Jehoshaphat king of Judah, and he reigned over Israel two years. 52 He did evil in the eyes of the LORD, because he followed the ways of his father and mother and of Jeroboam son of Nebat, who caused Israel to sin. 53 He served and worshiped Baal and aroused the anger of the LORD, the God of Israel, just as his father had done.

The End of 1 Kings



As we close this book of 1 Kings, with all its problems, and as we live in our own lives, with our own problems — what more can I offer to you than the “Deep Peace” of Christ — sung  HERE  by one of my favorite choirs, Libera.  The lyrics (below) were taken from an old Irish prayer.

Deep peace of the running wave to you
Deep peace of the flowing air to you

Deep peace of the quiet earth to you
Deep peace of the shining stars to you

Deep peace of the gentle night to you
Moon and stars pour their healing light on you

Deep peace of Christ
Of Christ
The light of the world to you

Deep peace of Christ to you


New International Version (NIV) Copyright © 1973, 1978, 1984, 2010 by Biblica

Images courtesy of:
1 Kings.    http://metroimages.s3.amazonaws.com/albumart/1kings-web720.png
target man.    http://www.prwatch.org/files/images/target_man.jpg
“I called to the Lord”   https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/236x/f6/68/a2/f668a2515c667dedabe259fb96a66ec3.jpg
Jehoshaphat.    http://www.christcenteredmall.com/teachings/kings/jehoshaphat.gif
worshiping idols.   https://www.ucg.org/files/image/article/profiles-of-faith-jeroboam-king-of-the-northern-ten-tribes.jpg